Interview: Sarcotrofia

We had all those elements in our logo as identity and also to honour our nation due to we were all Mozambicans in the band at the time, but now with a new line up within new members from other nations, it will also be changed.

If you are from a country that most of the world doesn’t know how to find on a map, it’s probably best to go for a name that sticks. SarcotrofiA started out as Sarcomaticaposa, which would definitely not help them any further. Playing metal music in Mozambique is definitely not an easy thing, which is part of the reason why the band has relocated to Sweden. Still, the ties run deep.

Though things are relatively quiet in Mozambique, the climate has still been rocky since conflicts have been erupting again since 2014. This has not affected the band much, since they decided to leave years ago. Unfortunately, this didn’t work out as planned and drummer Goro Fast was the only one to locate to Scandinavia. Having rebuild the band, he is now eager to pursue a heavy sound of Mozambique death metal.

Goro Fast was kind enough to answer a bunch of my questions. Enjoy!

E&D: Hello Sarcotrofia, how are things going for you?

Goro: Hey! We are doing great!

E&D: Can you tell me how the band started and about the history of the band?

Goro: Well! Long story but will try to sum up. The band comes from the ashes of another past band called Sarcomaticaposa founded by myself in 2006…then after several lineup changes it became SarcotrofiA…from there until now we have been working hard trying to bring the best-unexplored side of music to the listeners and lovers of this musical genre in attempt to create an identity as SarcotrofiA!

E&D: How did you guys get into metal music and what bands inspired the sound of SarcotrofiA?

Goro: Each member got into music in a different way, some by influence and others by self-interest, guess. we got many influences through everything connected to the music in general and some weird sounds/rhythm that’s why we don’t have a specific base just because we are from a society within a vast multicultural music background and we are always open for whatever may contribute to make us versatile musicians. So we individually might have specific bands that pulled us into metal, but SarcotrofiA is more into TechGrind and brutal death metal.

E&D: Your themes are listed as ‘Ghost Monks’ on Metal Archives. Can you tell me what that is about? What are the overall stories you want to tell with SarcotrofiA?

Goro: Ghost Monk track is more a metaphoric metamorphose theme within a contest that can be inserted or used in an imaginary situation. We normally don’t have a specific contest or storyline, we mostly write about what comes to mind at the time, within all the issues involved from politics to a daily bases.

E&D: I’m particularly interested in the logo you use with the elements of the Mozambique flag. Can you tell me more about these symbols and what role Mozambique plays in what SarcotrofiA is about?

Goro: We had all those elements in our logo as identity and also to honour our nation due to we were all Mozambicans in the band at the time, but now with a new line up within new members from other nations, it will also be changed.

Yah! The symbols according to our constitution has its political meaning, but for us, it expresses a determination, focus, objectives, and goal.

E&D: You moved to Sweden as a band. Why did you move and how was it to start again over there?

Goro: Yeah well! To make it clear, only one member moved. we were supposed to move as a band within all original members of the band but unfortunately only myself moved to Sweden and the other members of SarcotrofiA decided to step back and fall apart from the band to pursue a different paths in life because combining a normal life and a job became too stressful for some members to manage SarcotofiA’s heavy tour schedule and future plans.

We moved because we got a proposal from a record label that wanted to work with us, in a terms agreement of two years contract and a full-length album to record and promote.

It was Fucking hard to start over here, due to at first we had to get new members that would fit in the band and above all those which are willing to take further steps with us in serious and professional level, we had to face cultural shock, atmosphere, communication, lifestyle etc…it was a big challenge to face. But we are getting there and we are making any opportunity that will make it all worth it. You know: no risk, no fun! 

E&D: How do you go about creating music. Is it a collaborative effort or do band members have their own separate roles? Do you start with lyrics or music?

Goro: We basically make music together, but most of the tracks were created by myself, which is weird, because I make songs out of rhythmic melody then I make a transposition of the rhythm to a bassline tab and transcribe it into guitar charts afterwards, then the other member collaborate in making arrangements and give it a music sense line. So and about the lyrics, we don’t have a sequence, can be both at the same time or one task at the time no particular order.

E&D: Are you currently working on anything new? What direction are you taking SarcotrofiA in?

Goro: YES! We are still focusing on our length album, it takes time but we are working hard on it and soon will get there. The new material is more into tech, grindcore, and brutal death metal, so let’s see where is it going to take us.

E&D: How did metal music originally come to your country Mozambique? What bands pioneered the genre in the country? It seems that the scene is very young, but various bands are doing things now.

Goro: How it came? I can’t be precise! Because we don’t have archives registered. But, we grew up while metal music was there already and there were some bands from the 80’ and 90’s, such as: Panzers, Os tais, Moz-artes, Violent Desire, Invaders Strangers, Rude, Garganta, Pneus Furados, SPuG, Punk Vibration, Paranoia and etc…Then in the 2000’s we had new wave of metal as well which is still active so far.

Yeah, our scene is comparably young but is very solid and it ’s growing each day either in a number of bands or the crowd, we are in a good way, I can’t complain.

E&D: How is it now in Mozambique with facilities like recording studios, rehearsal space, availability of instruments etcetera…? Was or is there any censorship, either institutional or social? How much are you still in touch?

Goro: We don’t have a metal recording studios so far, the few recording studios we have are more focus in the Mozambican tropical vibes, jazz and traditional stuff and never rock and its ramification. We have some public rehearsal space, just need to book it and go there to bang bang, but most of the metal bands have their own practicing spot where they get together their gear and go to practice to keep in shape and sharp. We also have some music stores, where it’s easy to get whatever instrument you want either acoustics, electrics or digital, otherwise, we order online. We are constantly in touch, the roots are there and need to be updated time to time.

E&D: Which bands from Mozambique should people really check out and why?

Goro: This is a very tricky question, but there are lots of bands out there, and also depends on what music genre is on the bill. The easiest way is to dig them into social media or google about Mozambican metal scene lots will pop up.

E&D: What future plans do you currently have with the band?

Goro: The band is now focused in getting sharp and steel with new members, we also have a recording session on the go and a MASSIVE Attack tour for near future.

E&D: If you had to describe SarcotrofiA as a dish, what would it be and why?

Goro: Would be ‘Nhapfutela or Xipatsinheta’ because is a multicultural super joint band within a huge miscellaneous of everything, kinda all’in.

E&D: Is there anything you’d like to say that I forgot to ask?

Goro: …for those who want to follow us, check our FB page, click ‘’like’’ and get informed about everything related to the band and stuff.

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